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Angel's Thanatos
This is the last photo for the evening—While walking around the ruins and waiting for everyone else to catch up, my ears detected the faint sound of running water coming from the direction of what would have been the second floor. Running water was pooled up in the basement area, flowing down the mountain into parts unknown. I could feel a cold draft coming from the area of what used to be a large window that stared directly into the mountain.As I looked around for the source of the sound, I had seen out of the corner of my eye this tiny waterfall that was pouring from a crack underneath one of the massive windows. Turns out, there was a spring fed well halfway uphill from the ruins. The water was siphoned from the well via gravity through pipes that were built going down the side of the mountain. Because of the recent rains, there was a lot of water coming out of those pipes, creating this surreal sight of a waterfall flowing out of the ruins.

This is the last photo for the evening—

While walking around the ruins and waiting for everyone else to catch up, my ears detected the faint sound of running water coming from the direction of what would have been the second floor. Running water was pooled up in the basement area, flowing down the mountain into parts unknown. I could feel a cold draft coming from the area of what used to be a large window that stared directly into the mountain.

As I looked around for the source of the sound, I had seen out of the corner of my eye this tiny waterfall that was pouring from a crack underneath one of the massive windows. Turns out, there was a spring fed well halfway uphill from the ruins. The water was siphoned from the well via gravity through pipes that were built going down the side of the mountain. Because of the recent rains, there was a lot of water coming out of those pipes, creating this surreal sight of a waterfall flowing out of the ruins.

After inspecting the remains of the derelict Army Jeep, we decided to press on forward to what we were intending to search for all along—that enormous set of ruins that was once so imposing that one could see them from Highway 68 before the structure had burned in the 1970s. I could remember that during our very trip up here, I was quite intimidated by its daunting size, which appeared to be more massive in the midst of the dark, swirling mists. I went up ahead of everyone, wading through a patch of waist high weeds that had overtaken the pathway that led to the ruins. Souring nearly at level with the trees which surrounded it, I could spot the charred remnants. It was much colder next to the ruins than anywhere else, most likely due to it being built entirely of stone. The air here was chilly, yet clean. Even though the air was thin from being in the higher elevations, I found it easier to breathe.  Perhaps old Doc Rogers was onto something when he built this place so long ago….
I took this in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

After inspecting the remains of the derelict Army Jeep, we decided to press on forward to what we were intending to search for all along—that enormous set of ruins that was once so imposing that one could see them from Highway 68 before the structure had burned in the 1970s. I could remember that during our very trip up here, I was quite intimidated by its daunting size, which appeared to be more massive in the midst of the dark, swirling mists.

I went up ahead of everyone, wading through a patch of waist high weeds that had overtaken the pathway that led to the ruins. Souring nearly at level with the trees which surrounded it, I could spot the charred remnants. It was much colder next to the ruins than anywhere else, most likely due to it being built entirely of stone. The air here was chilly, yet clean. Even though the air was thin from being in the higher elevations, I found it easier to breathe.

Perhaps old Doc Rogers was onto something when he built this place so long ago….

I took this in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

We could barely see the fading medical cross on the side of the Jeep. Regrettably, it too had sustained damage from someone using it for target practice. The paint appeared to have been a dark olive green at one time, which blended into its surroundings almost perfectly.
I took this in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

We could barely see the fading medical cross on the side of the Jeep. Regrettably, it too had sustained damage from someone using it for target practice. The paint appeared to have been a dark olive green at one time, which blended into its surroundings almost perfectly.

I took this in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

boo-author:

starklyinaccurate:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.
If you are healthy, please reblog.If you are sick, please reblog.If you have a disability, please reblog.If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.If you are a human being, please reblog.Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 
Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

And people ask me why I am afraid to use my cane in public.Being disabled, visibly so is always dangerous

When I got my first cane and posted about it, I had people demanding to know why I thought I “deserved” it at my age.
That was the word.
"Deserved".

 I know of several people who have disabilities that aren’t clearly “seen” unless they were having a flare up that renders them unable to walk very far. I have a cousin who has lupus, a friend with fibromyalgia, and a friend of the family who is wearing a prosthetic leg due to severe diabetes. They have their good days and they have their bad days. It infuriates me when I hear of ignorant people placing such rude notes on people’s cars whom they deem to not actually be disabled. They should mind their own business and tend to their own affairs instead of placing ugly letters on disabled individual’s cars.
The second half of the comments on this subject reminds me of an issue that I am currently going through. Because of an accident at my old job a few years ago, I now have arthritis in my left leg. There are some days where I walk with a limp and others that I am walking normally. I fear that soon, I will be needing to use a cane. On the few occasions that I tell customers about it, I am always told, “But you’re still young. Your body can handle it.” I am 24 years old and my job has nearly destroyed my body because of all the heavy lifting I do. My joints ache before it rains or gets really cold. I find it very painful to walk on some days. But then again, I’m still young.

boo-author:

starklyinaccurate:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.

If you are healthy, please reblog.
If you are sick, please reblog.
If you have a disability, please reblog.
If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.
If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.
If you are a human being, please reblog.

Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 

Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

And people ask me why I am afraid to use my cane in public.

Being disabled, visibly so is always dangerous

When I got my first cane and posted about it, I had people demanding to know why I thought I “deserved” it at my age.

That was the word.

"Deserved".

 I know of several people who have disabilities that aren’t clearly “seen” unless they were having a flare up that renders them unable to walk very far. I have a cousin who has lupus, a friend with fibromyalgia, and a friend of the family who is wearing a prosthetic leg due to severe diabetes. They have their good days and they have their bad days. It infuriates me when I hear of ignorant people placing such rude notes on people’s cars whom they deem to not actually be disabled. They should mind their own business and tend to their own affairs instead of placing ugly letters on disabled individual’s cars.

The second half of the comments on this subject reminds me of an issue that I am currently going through. Because of an accident at my old job a few years ago, I now have arthritis in my left leg. There are some days where I walk with a limp and others that I am walking normally. I fear that soon, I will be needing to use a cane. On the few occasions that I tell customers about it, I am always told, “But you’re still young. Your body can handle it.” I am 24 years old and my job has nearly destroyed my body because of all the heavy lifting I do. My joints ache before it rains or gets really cold. I find it very painful to walk on some days. But then again, I’m still young.

A side view of the ruined Army Jeep. It was barely recognizable as a vehicle due to years of neglect and vandalism by area troublemakers. We were able to locate at least one interior light, which was surprisingly intact after all these years.
This is in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

A side view of the ruined Army Jeep. It was barely recognizable as a vehicle due to years of neglect and vandalism by area troublemakers. We were able to locate at least one interior light, which was surprisingly intact after all these years.

This is in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

(Source: sick-toy)

This is the inside of the remains of Doc’s former Army Jeep, which he had used on a daily basis while traveling around the county to treat his patients. According to what I have been told by a Coker Creek native, the Jeep used to stand next to the remains of the former house/clinic. It wasn’t until a group of people with questionable amounts of respect instilled in them that the Jeep was shoved downhill until it collided with a tree. The people then gutted the vehicle, removing almost every bit of it until only an empty shell remained. To add insult to injury, they used the Jeep for target practice. 
I took this in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

This is the inside of the remains of Doc’s former Army Jeep, which he had used on a daily basis while traveling around the county to treat his patients. According to what I have been told by a Coker Creek native, the Jeep used to stand next to the remains of the former house/clinic. It wasn’t until a group of people with questionable amounts of respect instilled in them that the Jeep was shoved downhill until it collided with a tree. The people then gutted the vehicle, removing almost every bit of it until only an empty shell remained. To add insult to injury, they used the Jeep for target practice.

I took this in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

When we had first made the difficult trek up the mountain to the remains of Doc’s place, the fog was so thick that we could only see a few feet ahead of us, save for the dark silhouettes of both trees and ruins, standing like lost spirits on the mountain. Because of that reduced visibility, we did not approach the remains of Doc Rogers’ Jeep, which lay on its side some distance away from the big house. 
This time around, we were able to go up to the pitiful wreck and take a closer look. There was something that was just downright sad about this, that this vehicle was so well known by the people of Tellico Plains and Coker Creek was simply forgotten in the higher elevations. Just why was his Jeep left here and not at his final place of residence, which was the Roundhouse in Tellico?
I took this in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

When we had first made the difficult trek up the mountain to the remains of Doc’s place, the fog was so thick that we could only see a few feet ahead of us, save for the dark silhouettes of both trees and ruins, standing like lost spirits on the mountain. Because of that reduced visibility, we did not approach the remains of Doc Rogers’ Jeep, which lay on its side some distance away from the big house. 

This time around, we were able to go up to the pitiful wreck and take a closer look. There was something that was just downright sad about this, that this vehicle was so well known by the people of Tellico Plains and Coker Creek was simply forgotten in the higher elevations. Just why was his Jeep left here and not at his final place of residence, which was the Roundhouse in Tellico?

I took this in Coker Creek, Tennessee.

"Imagine" (John Lennon cover) by A Perfect Circle

Imagine there’s no heaven
It’s easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people
Living for today…

Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people
Living life in peace…

You may say I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one
I hope someday you’ll join us
And the world will be as one

Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man
Imagine all the people
Sharing all the world…

You may say I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one
I hope someday you’ll join us
And the world will live as one

lovelucemferre:

Cloud Where’d you get that strength?

lovelucemferre:

Cloud Where’d you get that strength?